AskDefine | Define windy

The Collaborative Dictionary

Windy \Wind"y\, a. [Compar. Windier; superl. Windiest.] [AS. windig.] [1913 Webster]
Consisting of wind; accompanied or characterized by wind; exposed to wind. "The windy hill." --M. Arnold. [1913 Webster] Blown with the windy tempest of my heart. --Shak. [1913 Webster]
Next the wind; windward. [1913 Webster] It keeps on the windy side of care. --Shak. [1913 Webster]
Tempestuous; boisterous; as, windy weather. [1913 Webster]
Serving to occasion wind or gas in the intestines; flatulent; as, windy food. [1913 Webster]
Attended or caused by wind, or gas, in the intestines. "A windy colic." --Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster]
Fig.: Empty; airy. "Windy joy." --Milton. [1913 Webster] Here's that windy applause, that poor, transitory pleasure, for which I was dishonored. --South. [1913 Webster]

Word Net

windy adj
1 abounding in or exposed to the wind or breezes; "blowy weather"; "a windy bluff" [syn: blowy, breezy]
2 using or containing too many words; "long-winded (or windy) speakers"; "verbose and ineffective instructional methods"; "newspapers of the day printed long wordy editorials"; "proceedings were delayed by wordy disputes" [syn: long-winded, tedious, verbose, wordy] [also: windiest, windier]

Moby Thesaurus

adulterated, aeolian, air-built, airish, airy, all jaw, asinine, attenuate, attenuated, big, blasty, bloated, blown up, blowy, blustering, blusterous, blustery, bombastic, boreal, breezy, brisk, candid, catchpenny, chatty, chimerical, cloud-built, communicative, conversational, cut, de longue haleine, diffuse, dilated, dilute, diluted, distended, drafty, dreamlike, dropsical, edematous, effusive, empty, enchymatous, endless, ethereal, expansive, extended, extravagant, fanciful, fat, fatuitous, fatuous, favonian, filled out, fine, flatulent, flawy, flimsy, flip, fluent, foolish, frank, fresh, fribble, fribbling, frivolous, frothy, fustian, futile, gabby, garrulous, gaseous, gassy, glib, gossamery, gossipy, gregarious, gushy, gusty, high-flown, high-swelling, highfalutin, highfaluting, idle, illusory, imaginary, inane, incrassate, inflated, insubstantial, lengthy, light, long, long-drawn-out, long-spun, long-winded, longiloquent, loquacious, mouthy, multiloquent, multiloquious, newsy, nugacious, nugatory, otiose, overblown, overtalkative, padded, phantomlike, plethoric, pretentious, prolix, protracted, puffed up, puffy, pursy, rare, rarefied, redundant, shadowy, shallow, silly, slender, slight, smooth, sociable, spirituous, spun-out, squally, subtile, subtle, superficial, swelled, swollen, talkative, talky, tall, tenuous, thin, thinned, thinned-out, trifling, trite, trivial, tumescent, tumid, turgescent, turgid, uncompact, uncompressed, unreal, unrelenting, unsubstantial, vacuous, vain, vapid, vaporous, ventose, verbose, voluble, watered, watered-down, wordy

English

Etymology 1

From wind (weather condition) + -y.

Pronunciation

  • /ˈwɪndi/
  • Rhymes with: -ɪndi

Adjective

  1. Accompanied by wind.
    It was a long and windy night.
  2. Unsheltered and open to the wind.
    They made love in a windy bus shelter.
  3. Empty and lacking substance.
    They made windy promises they would not keep.
  4. Long-winded; orally verbose.
  5. Flatulent.
    The Tex-Mex meal had made them somewhat windy.

Translations

accompanied by wind
unsheltered and open to the wind
empty and lacking substance
flatulent

Noun

Etymology 2

From wind + -y.

Pronunciation

  • /ˈwaɪndi/

Adjective

  1. In the context of "of a path etc": Having many bends; winding, twisting or tortuous.
"Windy" is a pop music song written by Ruthann Friedman and recorded by The Association. Released in 1967, the song reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in July of that year. Later in 1967, an instrumental version by jazz guitarist Wes Montgomery became his biggest Hot 100 hit when it peaked at number forty-four. "Windy" was The Association's second U.S. number-one, following "Cherish" in 1966.
According to rumor, the original lyrics by Ruthann Friedman were about a man, and The Association changed them to be about a woman However, Friedman eventually admitted that it had in fact been written about her dog, who had "stormy eyes" and walked "down the streets of the city, smiling at everybody she sees..."
The song was featured in an episode of The Drew Carey Show, where the character Nigel Wick (played by Craig Ferguson) played it on the harp. It was also featured recently in the second season finale of HBO's Big Love, where Teeny Henrickson leads a children's dance troupe while the song is playing for the annual Pioneers Festival.
Barry Manilow and The Association covered this song along with Cherish on the 2006 album The Greatest Songs of the Sixties.
The harpsichord/bass guitar riff on Windy is similar to the guitar riff on the 1966 song Kicks by Paul Revere and the Raiders.

References

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